it’s been a while…

I haven’t wrote anything on here in a while and I don’t have a good reason. Been busy with the kids, buying and selling houses and coaching football this past year and decided to just let the blog rest. I do miss jotting down things I think about so perhaps I’ll write more in 2015. I’d sure like to get rid of that house in central corridor right about now. Dropped some mail Friday so hopefully the phone rings a lot this week. Me and Junior checked out the NFL Experience in downtown Phoenix today(Superbowl is here in Phoenix this year). He enjoyed the HUGE blow up football and looking inside the new GMC trucks more than anything. Didn’t catch the Pro Bowl but from the highlights it looks like it was entertaining! Stock market is still toying with new highs.. Gas is rediculously cheap. Housing seems okay.. Kind of quiet in Phoenix but very much a seller’s market in Portland. Will be interesting to see how far the stock market can inflate and if they can get loans flowing. Market could inflate if they do those 2 things.. Gold and silver have started to rise in the past month. I wonder if we saw the bottom in the mid teens or what will happen. Still mostly lower lows on a longer term chart..


From my RE blog!

Originally posted on MyPadAZ:


By now most of us have a decent understanding of how the subprime mortgage mess came to a meltdown.

Easy money caught up with us when borrowers could no longer afford their minimum payments, which were usually their mortgages, which had been refinanced(or leveraged with home-equity loans) to pay off unsecured credit cards which had been used to finance liabilities like cars, boats, college, home improvements etc.

But can you really blame someone for being handed easy money?

I mean think about it.. The media pushes the message because it is bought and paid for, just like the political parties and currency systems, and by the same people.

The message is to spend money you don’t have.

The government does that, why shouldn’t you?

And now, four years past Ground Zero of the recession, and easy money is still available. How can this be? And who can still qualify?

View original 436 more words

Gas prices and the middle class

I have noticed lately it seems gas is most expensive in Ritzville and in the Hood. Life seems to be the same way – the rich and the poor stimulate the economy. Rather ..the rich and the poor are the economy, or so it seems. And the middle class always seems to find a way to separate themselves from it just a simple observation today..

Okay I’m not saying the middle class are not actuall part of the economy honestly that would be foolish. I’m just saying it seems that the rich buy the asset that the poor spend money on which are liabilities to the poor. The middle-class, the real middle-class, which is greatly shrinking and for the reasons I am talking about here(that and they are at or approaching retirement), stash their cash and avoid paying interest. In an economy that is entirely built on debt, very little is contributed financially outside of the fractional reserve dollars that they create by holding their money in savings. However, the real value created by these people is usually very high when you look at the quality of workmanship they produce in the small business sector. The rich and the government however beat the hell out of them. We have been seeing this especially in recent years with this bloodbath of the middle class.


Rental Rates Up 18% in Phoenix – Great News For Cash Flow Real Estate Investors!




Rental rates up 18% in Phoenix


Phoenix rental rates are up 18% in the last 12 months, making it one of the greatest places in the nation to invest in cash flowing real estate! Couple this with the fact that Arizona continues to grow with education across the valley as well as being one of the premiere retirement spots in the world as baby boomers are approaching retirement and rapidly moving towards Phoenix. Values and rental rates are increasing along with a greater demand for rentals, as unfortunately, foreclosures still plague the state.



BPO: the most important part of a short sale

“BPO” stands for “Broker Price Opinion.” It is a report for the given value of a property, that a real estate agent will give to a lender to determine what to do with a property where they have a loan. And it is just what it sounds like, an opinion! All they do is quickly glance at the recent solds in the neighborhood, and go to the house to take pictures(they are at the property no longer than 10 minutes – a time frame that no buyer would feel comfortable making a solid offer in, given that it is not enough time to do any due diligence on a property to see what it has/needs.

Without going into too much detail here, let me just tell you I met both an appraiser and a BPO agent at a property yesterday, on a property valued somewhere in the  $2 million range. Because I met both the agent doing the BPO, and the appraiser, the property will close because they have a keen understanding of what is really going on, since I took the time to enlighten them. Can you imagine if I just left it up to the opinion of the two people who had spent no more than a couple of hours looking at the subject property?!(and in cases of cheaper house, taken no more than maybe 20 minutes analyzing the value!)

And then this morning I met another BPO agent on another property we are doing a deal on, valued around only $100,000. The property probably would have came back to the bank with a broker price opinion at $130,000 or more if I hadn’t been there to meet the agent, in addition to sending her comps and letting her know the listing history prior to her arriving at the property. I also took the time to make sure she actually looked at all of the systems in the house and pointed out needed repairs. Had I not been there the agent would have not seen any of the needed repairs or structural issues to the house. These things have a significant impact to the buyer and many agents fail to realize they have two ends of each short sale transaction to work, not just the buyer, but the bank too!

If you were to ask a room full of real estate agents what the biggest factor is in the success of a short sale transaction, I would presume you would hear dozens of different answers. Answers ranging from how severe the homeowners hardship is, to how much money in retirement accounts the homeowner has, to whether or not the person that is on the loan actually ever lived in the house or was just a cosigner, or the most common…”who is the bank?” I would like to think one or two agents would get it right, but would be surprised to hear much more than that. While these factors do play a role in the short sale settlement, they are not THE most important factor.

The answer is simple, and it only contains three letters: BPO. The BPO is the hinge of the entire short sale. If you have a high BPO you are probably not going to close your short sale, unless that is of course, if you can get another BPO ordered and have enough time to go through that process. I have seen more short sales go to foreclosure because the BPO was not addressed properly then any other reason for short sale transactions not closing.

It takes approximately 10 minutes to comp a property(look up current home sales) and send that email to the agent who is processing the BPO, prior to them arriving at the property. It takes usually no more than an hour to drive to the property, meet the agent there, and then tell them where your offer is and the listing history,  shake their hand and walk away. Sometimes you may leave the property feeling like you are going to get a high-value, and sometimes it will be the opposite, where you will leave feeling energized and know that you are going to have a slam dunk deal when the bank finds out they are getting more money out of the transaction after their closing costs then the true value of the property.

Setting up properly and processing the BPO correctly as the listing agent will be the deciding factor in 90% of short sales. I don’t care what the hardship is or how much excess cash the seller has, or even how much assets they have or none of that. I care what the value is and what the net is to the lender. Since I do have control over these things, contrary to popular opinion, I close consistently the short sales I take on.

It’s not rocket science.. Influence what you have control over. This is no different than anything else in the real estate business or for that matter, life.

To inquire about referring Joshua Gayman a short sale in the Arizona area or for assistance with negotiating a short sale of your self or for a client, or if you are a homeowner and another state just looking for guidance and true counsel, give me a call – I’d love to chat!

-Joshua Gayman